UK OFFICE : +44 (0)1260 273 802
BRUSSELS OFFICE : +32 (0)2 895 5909

UK OFFICE : +44 (0)1260 273 802
BRUSSELS OFFICE : +32 (0)2 895 5909

Italy’s electoral law put government at risk
©Sarah-Rose

Italy’s electoral law put government at risk

12/10/17Government

The Italian government delivered an ultimatum on the country’s most tenacious political problem, the electoral law under which voters will choose a new government next year.

Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni’s coalition government called for a confidence vote on the law.

The move replaces a series of secret ballots with a single vote on which the government’s survival will depend. If the vote passes, the government and the law stands, if not, both fail.

Law makers from the anti-establishment Five Star Movement, which has criticised the proposed electoral system as a plot to suppress their numbers in parliament, declared the confidence vote an “attack on democracy” promising to take to the streets.

An election is due next year, much to the outcome will depend on the law under which it is held.

The way in which the Chamber of Deputies, Italy’s lower house, is elected was reformed by former Prime Minister Mateo Renzi, who was unable to reform the Senate – the upper house. If an election was to be held under this mix, it indicates that there would be no viable coalition in parliament, or an alliance.

Critics say that it is not that an electoral law is difficult to design, but that the parties appear unable to put aside their own interests to agree on one.

Pan European Networks Ltd